LEANING ART: EFFORTLESS COOL

 

I've noticed a common thread in some favorite "effortless-cool" spaces. 

Source  Design by William McLure.

Source Design by William McLure.

Source  Design by Benjamin Dhong.

Source Design by Benjamin Dhong.

LEANING ART.

Whether leaning against a wall on the floor, mantle or picture ledge, there is definitely something relaxed and casual about displaying art and photographs this way.  And yes, I realize me overanalyzing these things isn't very "cool".  Ha!  I'm a design nerd, can't help it (shrug)!

Source  Design by Mark D. Sikes.

Source Design by Mark D. Sikes.

Why do I like this look so much?

  1. It offers a very effortlessly layered look.

  2. It's practical: refreshing the display is as easy as shuffling the art or adding a new art piece.

  3. No nail holes (ask my husband: I'm not afraid to make nail holes and rearrange periodically. A little spackle and paint and wa la, clean wall again. But yes, for those of you who are afraid of regretting making a nail hole, leaning is a great option.).

  4. What you display is only limited by the depth of the shelf. Rather than displaying art, the picture ledge could be used to display anything from books (what an awesome way for the kids to find their books easily!), to old record collections.

Source  Design by Archi-Tectonics photographed by Richard Powers.

Source Design by Archi-Tectonics photographed by Richard Powers.

Tips for Leaning Art

  1. Use different height frames and pieces to make for a more interesting display.

  2. Lean it anywhere, as long as it's the right scale. You don't want a teeny tiny frame leaning against the wall on the floor.

  3. Consider the vignette as a whole (on mantels and dressers). You might flank it with something with height like candlesticks or lamps and create additional layers in front of the "leaners" with unique boxes or small sculptures.

  4. It's okay if frames in front of frames or art in front of art cover some of the photograph or art. It looks like a layered collection if you're not too afraid to cover the preceding art or photo.

Source  Design by William McLure.

Source Design by William McLure.

Notice the photography over the art.  This is an extreme example, as not much of the art is visible, but I think it's opulent and such a good example of layering.  Stunning!

Source  Brooke Shields collaborated with decorator David Flint Wood. Photographed by William Waldron.

Source Brooke Shields collaborated with decorator David Flint Wood. Photographed by William Waldron.

If you're unsure of how to display your art and photos, consider leaning on a picture ledge, furniture piece, or mantel.  

If you're still needing a little help in getting your family photos out of the shoebox and displayed in your space, or if you need art of a certain size or style to pull off the look you're going for, you can contact me here: I'd love to help!

 
Joelle SomeroComment